SRX Recalled for An Acceleration Lag of 3-4 Seconds

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Tagged
#recall #engine
Source
carcomplaints.com
An overhead view of a parking lot with cars neatly lined up inside parking spaces.

The 2013 Cadillac SRX is being recalled because of an acceleration lag of 3 to 4 seconds. I'm sure that goes over great with your fellow commuters when driving to work. Faulty programming in the transmission control module (TCM) is making your car so slow to respond to the gas pedal that even turtles on benadryl are saying "dude, hurry up". To be fair, conditions have to be just right for the lag to occur. According to GM, the problem only happens when the driver:

  1. Accelerates from first to second gear (8-10mph)
  2. Hits the brakes, slowing the vehicle to under 5mph
  3. Accelerates -- or at least try to accelerate -- again

Do all these steps in 2 seconds or less and you win a prize package containing acceleration lag and a baker's dozen of one-fingered salutes.

There are over 50,000 vehicles affected, including most 2013 Cadillac SRX vehicles with 3.6L engines. No recall schedule has been announced, but chances are it won't take a decade like some other GM recalls. Authorized dealers will reprogram the TCM, but it's unlikely they can get rid of all one-fingered salutes on your morning commute.

More information on carcomplaints.com

Related Cadillac Generations

At least one model year in these 1 generations have a relationship to this story.

We track this because a generation is just a group of model years where very little changes from year-to-year. Chances are owners throughout these generation will want to know about this news. Click on a generation for more information.

  1. 2nd Generation SRX

    Years
    2010–2017
    Reliability
    35th of 35
    PainRank
    14.81
    Complaints
    327
    Continue

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